World premiere Vanessa Lann – Rise for two bassoons and (amateur) orchestra

Geplaatst op

Martine Reurings & Dick Hanemaayer (bassoons) and the Van Wassenaer Orchestra under the direction of Benjamin Boers will perform the world premiere of Rise of Vanessa Lann on November 19…  

A more prominent role for the bassoon – not hidden within, but standing in front of, the orchestra – that is what the Dutch Bassoon Network wished to create through its commission to Vanessa Lann to compose a concerto for two bassoons and orchestra. And with the unique goal of creating a work primarily intended for amateur bassoonists. The Dutch Performing Arts Fund provided the financial support for this commission. The first performance will take place on Sunday, 19th November 2017, featuring Dick Hanemaayer and Martine Reurings as soloists, along with the Van Wassenaer Orchestra under the direction of Benjamin Broers.

Concertos for two bassoons and orchestra have existed for some time, but this work is unique: the sound combinations between the two bassoons are totally new, as are the timbres within the orchestra. The work begins with the two bassoon soloists, the first bassoon standing before the orchestra, and the second bassoon answering from within the ensemble. Their tones intertwine in short garlands, followed by repeated rhythms that will return in the second movement to give an important impulse to the music. With a leap of a minor ninth the bassoonists land on the beloved low C. That’s how the first movement begins. And yes, after the first movement the title of the piece will be celebrated, quite literally. But “Rise” (as a piece and as a project) is unique for other reasons. From the very start the main goal was to give as many players as possible the opportunity to perform the work. Special arrangements have also been made with the publishing house Donemus to make the work available to orchestras inside and outside the Netherlands. The two bassoonists from each orchestra performing the piece will have their hands full with the notes and rhythms. Even though the piece does not contain the virtuoso passages and cadenzas of the typical classical solo concerto, the solo parts are still demanding in other ways. In the second movement the music speeds up, with repeated rhythmic patterns. The third movement brings the sounds, tones and intervals from the first movement back into the picture. And in the fourth movement the rhythmic interplay within the entire orchestra leads to a surprising conclusion…..

Van Wassenaer Orchestra

Rise at the Donemus Webshop

Dutch Bassoon Network